14 Jan

It Starts with One-Partnering Meeting Leads to Unique Public-Private Partnership

Roy Zwahlen took a long shot when he requested a meeting with an investment firm at the 2017 BIO International Convention in San Diego. As Assistant Dean for Innovation and Strategy at the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy and the Eshelman Institute for Innovation, Zwahlen was in search of a partnership that could help bring the University’s science to the marketplace. He was aware of the firm’s  interest in unique partnerships with leading academic research institutions and discovered, to his delight, the firm  was participating in BIO One-on-One Partnering™.

BIO One-on-One Partnering facilitates upwards of 45,000 one-on-one meetings among 7,000 partnering delegates during the four days of the Convention. It has an intuitive interface that allows participants to search company and investor profiles to identify the right prospects and begin a direct dialogue with potential partners. The impressive database includes biopharma and medical technology companies, in-licensors, investors, and others across the life sciences. The program will automatically add scheduled meetings to Outlook calendars and retains meeting histories across multiple conferences.

So Zwahlen took his shot. “I didn’t actually think it would be a good place to connect with them. I presumed the VCs get a lot of requests at these meetings and have limited capacity to field meeting requests.  However, I was pleasantly surprised that they were available and interested in meeting.

Zwahlen was strategic in his use of the partnering system. He sent his meeting requests early on (participants can sign up as early as February!) and he made sure his pitch to the firm aligned with what they were interested in.“UNC was looking for unique public-private partnership models that could both increase our chances of taking research from the bench to the bedside and accelerate the process. When we learned that the investment firm was exploring unique partnerships with leading research institutions and that they were in the BIO partnering system, we hoped BIO would be the perfect place to begin discussions about a potential partnership and we were pleasantly surprised.”

The rest, as they say, is history. In October of last year, UNC-Chapel Hill and the investment firm announced a $65 million commitment promising new drug research at UNC-Chapel Hill across a wide range of therapeutic areas through the creation of a company called Pinnacle Hill. Profits from successful projects will be shared by the firm  and UNC-Chapel Hill.

Preparation, planning and research were the keys to Zwahlen’s success. Getting started early allowed him to evaluate the partnering database and meet those with mutual interests. BIO provides guidance for using the partnering system with webinars like this every year and a team is available to answer questions anytime.

As Zwahlen noted, “The Convention was really the critical starting point for the relationship. The process took several phone calls, several onsite visits by the investment firm to evaluate our science, a process of learning how the other partner works and how best to streamline our efforts…”

UNC-Chapel Hill  can attest to the BIO 2019 theme-It Starts with One. A promising partnership “started with one” meeting and blossomed into a solid collaboration.

14 Jan

BUILDING A LOW-CARBON, CLIMATE RESILIENT FUTURE: SECURE, CLEAN AND EFFICIENT ENERGY

[Source: http://ec.europa.eu/health/ageing/innovation/index_en.htm] Identifier: H2020-LC-SC3-2018-2019-2020Pillar: Societal ChallengesOpening Date: Deadline: Wed, 31 Jan 2018 17:00:00 (Brussels local time)Modification Date: Mon, 14 Jan 2019Latest information: Please note that the latest information on results (Flash Call Info) of the first stage evaluation for topics LC-SC3-RES-1-2019 and LC-SC3-RES-14-2019 (that closed on 16 October 2018) can be found in the “Additional Documents” section of the relevant topics.
For successful applicants invited at stage 2 for these topics, please note that the generalised feedback with tips on how to improve your proposal is now also available in the “Additional Documents” section of the respective topics.
The possibility to work in the submission system on the full proposal should be activated as of tomorrow.

14 Jan

Kaleido Bio and Cirius Join an IPO Queue Stalled by Federal Shutdown

The partial government shutdown may have diminished staffing at the SEC, but it hasn’t dimmed the hopes of biotech firms hoping to go public. On Friday, Kaleido Biosciences and Cirius Therapeutics both filed paperwork for their respective initial public offerings with the securities regulator.

While it’s operating with “very limited staff” due to the shutdown, the SEC’s electronic system for regulatory filings is still up and running. Kaleido and Cirius join a handful of biotechs that have filed for IPOs since the shutdown started last month.

Kaleido, a microbiome drugs developer, set a preliminary $100 million target for its IPO. The… Read more »

UNDERWRITERS AND PARTNERS

          

          

            

14 Jan

It Starts with One-Partnering Meeting Leads to Unique Public-Private Partnership

Roy Zwahlen took a long shot when he requested a meeting with an investment firm at the 2017 BIO International Convention in San Diego. As Assistant Dean for Innovation and Strategy at the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy and the Eshelman Institute for Innovation, Zwahlen was in search of a partnership that could help bring the University’s science to the marketplace. He was aware of the firm’s  interest in unique partnerships with leading academic research institutions and discovered, to his delight, the firm  was participating in BIO One-on-One Partnering™.

BIO One-on-One Partnering facilitates upwards of 45,000 one-on-one meetings among 7,000 partnering delegates during the four days of the Convention. It has an intuitive interface that allows participants to search company and investor profiles to identify the right prospects and begin a direct dialogue with potential partners. The impressive database includes biopharma and medical technology companies, in-licensors, investors, and others across the life sciences. The program will automatically add scheduled meetings to Outlook calendars and retains meeting histories across multiple conferences.

So Zwahlen took his shot. “I didn’t actually think it would be a good place to connect with them. I presumed the VCs get a lot of requests at these meetings and have limited capacity to field meeting requests.  However, I was pleasantly surprised that they were available and interested in meeting.

Zwahlen was strategic in his use of the partnering system. He sent his meeting requests early on (participants can sign up as early as February!) and he made sure his pitch to the firm aligned with what they were interested in.“UNC was looking for unique public-private partnership models that could both increase our chances of taking research from the bench to the bedside and accelerate the process. When we learned that the investment firm was exploring unique partnerships with leading research institutions and that they were in the BIO partnering system, we hoped BIO would be the perfect place to begin discussions about a potential partnership and we were pleasantly surprised.”

The rest, as they say, is history. In October of last year, UNC-Chapel Hill and the investment firm announced a $65 million commitment promising new drug research at UNC-Chapel Hill across a wide range of therapeutic areas through the creation of a company called Pinnacle Hill. Profits from successful projects will be shared by the firm  and UNC-Chapel Hill.

Preparation, planning and research were the keys to Zwahlen’s success. Getting started early allowed him to evaluate the partnering database and meet those with mutual interests. BIO provides guidance for using the partnering system with webinars like this every year and a team is available to answer questions anytime.

As Zwahlen noted, “The Convention was really the critical starting point for the relationship. The process took several phone calls, several onsite visits by the investment firm to evaluate our science, a process of learning how the other partner works and how best to streamline our efforts…”

UNC-Chapel Hill  can attest to the BIO 2019 theme-It Starts with One. A promising partnership “started with one” meeting and blossomed into a solid collaboration.

13 Jan

Kaleido Bio and Cirius Join an IPO Queue Stalled by Federal Shutdown

The partial government shutdown may have diminished staffing at the SEC, but it hasn’t dimmed the hopes of biotech firms hoping to go public. On Friday, Kaleido Biosciences and Cirius Therapeutics both filed paperwork for their respective initial public offerings with the securities regulator.

While it’s operating with “very limited staff” due to the shutdown, the SEC’s electronic system for regulatory filings is still up and running. Kaleido and Cirius join a handful of biotechs that have filed for IPOs since the shutdown started last month.

Kaleido, a microbiome drugs developer, set a preliminary $100 million target for its IPO. The… Read more »

UNDERWRITERS AND PARTNERS

          

          

            

13 Jan

It Starts with One-Partnering Meeting Leads to Unique Public-Private Partnership

Roy Zwahlen took a long shot when he requested a meeting with an investment firm at the 2017 BIO International Convention in San Diego. As Assistant Dean for Innovation and Strategy at the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy and the Eshelman Institute for Innovation, Zwahlen was in search of a partnership that could help bring the University’s science to the marketplace. He was aware of the firm’s  interest in unique partnerships with leading academic research institutions and discovered, to his delight, the firm  was participating in BIO One-on-One Partnering™.

BIO One-on-One Partnering facilitates upwards of 45,000 one-on-one meetings among 7,000 partnering delegates during the four days of the Convention. It has an intuitive interface that allows participants to search company and investor profiles to identify the right prospects and begin a direct dialogue with potential partners. The impressive database includes biopharma and medical technology companies, in-licensors, investors, and others across the life sciences. The program will automatically add scheduled meetings to Outlook calendars and retains meeting histories across multiple conferences.

So Zwahlen took his shot. “I didn’t actually think it would be a good place to connect with them. I presumed the VCs get a lot of requests at these meetings and have limited capacity to field meeting requests.  However, I was pleasantly surprised that they were available and interested in meeting.

Zwahlen was strategic in his use of the partnering system. He sent his meeting requests early on (participants can sign up as early as February!) and he made sure his pitch to the firm aligned with what they were interested in.“UNC was looking for unique public-private partnership models that could both increase our chances of taking research from the bench to the bedside and accelerate the process. When we learned that the investment firm was exploring unique partnerships with leading research institutions and that they were in the BIO partnering system, we hoped BIO would be the perfect place to begin discussions about a potential partnership and we were pleasantly surprised.”

The rest, as they say, is history. In October of last year, UNC-Chapel Hill and the investment firm announced a $65 million commitment promising new drug research at UNC-Chapel Hill across a wide range of therapeutic areas through the creation of a company called Pinnacle Hill. Profits from successful projects will be shared by the firm  and UNC-Chapel Hill.

Preparation, planning and research were the keys to Zwahlen’s success. Getting started early allowed him to evaluate the partnering database and meet those with mutual interests. BIO provides guidance for using the partnering system with webinars like this every year and a team is available to answer questions anytime.

As Zwahlen noted, “The Convention was really the critical starting point for the relationship. The process took several phone calls, several onsite visits by the investment firm to evaluate our science, a process of learning how the other partner works and how best to streamline our efforts…”

UNC-Chapel Hill  can attest to the BIO 2019 theme-It Starts with One. A promising partnership “started with one” meeting and blossomed into a solid collaboration.

13 Jan

Kaleido Bio and Cirius Join an IPO Queue Stalled by Federal Shutdown

The partial government shutdown may have diminished staffing at the SEC, but it hasn’t dimmed the hopes of biotech firms hoping to go public. On Friday, Kaleido Biosciences and Cirius Therapeutics both filed paperwork for their respective initial public offerings with the securities regulator.

While it’s operating with “very limited staff” due to the shutdown, the SEC’s electronic system for regulatory filings is still up and running. Kaleido and Cirius join a handful of biotechs that have filed for IPOs since the shutdown started last month.

Kaleido, a microbiome drugs developer, set a preliminary $100 million target for its IPO. The… Read more »

UNDERWRITERS AND PARTNERS

          

          

            

13 Jan

It Starts with One-Partnering Meeting Leads to Unique Public-Private Partnership

Roy Zwahlen took a long shot when he requested a meeting with an investment firm at the 2017 BIO International Convention in San Diego. As Assistant Dean for Innovation and Strategy at the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy and the Eshelman Institute for Innovation, Zwahlen was in search of a partnership that could help bring the University’s science to the marketplace. He was aware of the firm’s  interest in unique partnerships with leading academic research institutions and discovered, to his delight, the firm  was participating in BIO One-on-One Partnering™.

BIO One-on-One Partnering facilitates upwards of 45,000 one-on-one meetings among 7,000 partnering delegates during the four days of the Convention. It has an intuitive interface that allows participants to search company and investor profiles to identify the right prospects and begin a direct dialogue with potential partners. The impressive database includes biopharma and medical technology companies, in-licensors, investors, and others across the life sciences. The program will automatically add scheduled meetings to Outlook calendars and retains meeting histories across multiple conferences.

So Zwahlen took his shot. “I didn’t actually think it would be a good place to connect with them. I presumed the VCs get a lot of requests at these meetings and have limited capacity to field meeting requests.  However, I was pleasantly surprised that they were available and interested in meeting.

Zwahlen was strategic in his use of the partnering system. He sent his meeting requests early on (participants can sign up as early as February!) and he made sure his pitch to the firm aligned with what they were interested in.“UNC was looking for unique public-private partnership models that could both increase our chances of taking research from the bench to the bedside and accelerate the process. When we learned that the investment firm was exploring unique partnerships with leading research institutions and that they were in the BIO partnering system, we hoped BIO would be the perfect place to begin discussions about a potential partnership and we were pleasantly surprised.”

The rest, as they say, is history. In October of last year, UNC-Chapel Hill and the investment firm announced a $65 million commitment promising new drug research at UNC-Chapel Hill across a wide range of therapeutic areas through the creation of a company called Pinnacle Hill. Profits from successful projects will be shared by the firm  and UNC-Chapel Hill.

Preparation, planning and research were the keys to Zwahlen’s success. Getting started early allowed him to evaluate the partnering database and meet those with mutual interests. BIO provides guidance for using the partnering system with webinars like this every year and a team is available to answer questions anytime.

As Zwahlen noted, “The Convention was really the critical starting point for the relationship. The process took several phone calls, several onsite visits by the investment firm to evaluate our science, a process of learning how the other partner works and how best to streamline our efforts…”

UNC-Chapel Hill  can attest to the BIO 2019 theme-It Starts with One. A promising partnership “started with one” meeting and blossomed into a solid collaboration.

12 Jan

Kaleido Bio and Cirius Join an IPO Queue Stalled by Federal Shutdown

The partial government shutdown may have diminished staffing at the SEC, but it hasn’t dimmed the hopes of biotech firms hoping to go public. On Friday, Kaleido Biosciences and Cirius Therapeutics both filed paperwork for their respective initial public offerings with the securities regulator.

While it’s operating with “very limited staff” due to the shutdown, the SEC’s electronic system for regulatory filings is still up and running. Kaleido and Cirius join a handful of biotechs that have filed for IPOs since the shutdown started last month.

Kaleido, a microbiome drugs developer, set a preliminary $100 million target for its IPO. The… Read more »

UNDERWRITERS AND PARTNERS

          

          

            

12 Jan

It Starts with One-Partnering Meeting Leads to Unique Public-Private Partnership

Roy Zwahlen took a long shot when he requested a meeting with an investment firm at the 2017 BIO International Convention in San Diego. As Assistant Dean for Innovation and Strategy at the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy and the Eshelman Institute for Innovation, Zwahlen was in search of a partnership that could help bring the University’s science to the marketplace. He was aware of the firm’s  interest in unique partnerships with leading academic research institutions and discovered, to his delight, the firm  was participating in BIO One-on-One Partnering™.

BIO One-on-One Partnering facilitates upwards of 45,000 one-on-one meetings among 7,000 partnering delegates during the four days of the Convention. It has an intuitive interface that allows participants to search company and investor profiles to identify the right prospects and begin a direct dialogue with potential partners. The impressive database includes biopharma and medical technology companies, in-licensors, investors, and others across the life sciences. The program will automatically add scheduled meetings to Outlook calendars and retains meeting histories across multiple conferences.

So Zwahlen took his shot. “I didn’t actually think it would be a good place to connect with them. I presumed the VCs get a lot of requests at these meetings and have limited capacity to field meeting requests.  However, I was pleasantly surprised that they were available and interested in meeting.

Zwahlen was strategic in his use of the partnering system. He sent his meeting requests early on (participants can sign up as early as February!) and he made sure his pitch to the firm aligned with what they were interested in.“UNC was looking for unique public-private partnership models that could both increase our chances of taking research from the bench to the bedside and accelerate the process. When we learned that the investment firm was exploring unique partnerships with leading research institutions and that they were in the BIO partnering system, we hoped BIO would be the perfect place to begin discussions about a potential partnership and we were pleasantly surprised.”

The rest, as they say, is history. In October of last year, UNC-Chapel Hill and the investment firm announced a $65 million commitment promising new drug research at UNC-Chapel Hill across a wide range of therapeutic areas through the creation of a company called Pinnacle Hill. Profits from successful projects will be shared by the firm  and UNC-Chapel Hill.

Preparation, planning and research were the keys to Zwahlen’s success. Getting started early allowed him to evaluate the partnering database and meet those with mutual interests. BIO provides guidance for using the partnering system with webinars like this every year and a team is available to answer questions anytime.

As Zwahlen noted, “The Convention was really the critical starting point for the relationship. The process took several phone calls, several onsite visits by the investment firm to evaluate our science, a process of learning how the other partner works and how best to streamline our efforts…”

UNC-Chapel Hill  can attest to the BIO 2019 theme-It Starts with One. A promising partnership “started with one” meeting and blossomed into a solid collaboration.